How do we make sense of the atrocities that are committed every day in the world? Is there a source of evil behind such things? In this episode, I will discuss the Buddhist understanding of non-dichotomy in relationship to good and evil. How does our understanding of interdependence influence our way of understanding the horrible
We all experience ups and downs in life but it’s important to remember that we should never get caught up in these moments. To enjoy the “whole” experience of life, we must learn to see past the individual highs and lows and instead focus our perspective on the big picture.

The Power of Compassion

The Buddha taught that in order to realize enlightenment, a person must develop two qualities: wisdom and compassion. These two qualities are sometimes compared to two wings that must work together to achieve flight, or two eyes that work together to be able to experience depth perception.
1) Empty your mind. A student went to visit a famous Zen master. While the master quietly served tea, the student talked about Zen. The master poured the visitor’s cup to the brim, and then kept pouring. The student watched the overflowing cup until he could no longer restrain himself. “It’s full! No more will go
This expression comes from the tale “The Emperor’s New Clothes” by Hans Christian Andersen. In it, there was an emperor who loved wearing fine clothes and spent all of his people’s money on them. He had a different set for each hour and was, without doubt, the finest dressed man in the land.

The Happy Fish

Two Zen masters were walking beside a stream. “How happily the fish are swimming in the stream,” observed one. “You do not know the fish are swimming happily,” observed the other, thoroughly schooled in the notion of projection! “You do not know that I do not know that the fish are swimming happily,” countered the